candid wines at Bakersfield Restaurant

We are thrilled to be part of the dining experience at Bakersfield Restaurant and look forward to helping the staff learn about the people and the vineyards behind the wines from candid on the list. If you are a consumer who found this page while searching either for the restaurant or for one of the wines, we hope you’ll enjoy browsing as well. Each winery represented at Bakersfield has a tab below that presents the specific wine and a bit about the people behind the bottle, from Fred Scherrer in Sonoma to Nicole Moncuit in Champagne. Clicking on the wineries’ names in the text will take you to their home page on our site. If you are a member of the staff and have additional questions, please email Damien at damien@candidwines.com for more information.

Zinfandoodle, Scherrer Winery, Sonoma County

Scherrer Winery: Fred Scherrer is the driving force behind the Scherrer Winery;

Fred Scherrer

he sources fruit,Zinfandoodle is a single vineyard Zinfandel from the Scherrer Vineyard
helps guide choices in each vineyard, he operates the presses (the motors of which he modified and maintains), he bottles everything by hand, he tests the corks for quality…Fact is, he does an incredible amount on his own, but he is not alone. Fred’s wife Judi manages the business side of winery, and the family vineyard, the source for most all of the fruit that goes into the Scherrer Winery’s Cabernet, Chardonnay, and Zinfandel bottlings is managed by Fred’s parents and sister. This is a family affair.
Read more about Scherrer winery

zinfandoodle v.8.9

Zinfandoodle v.8.9: Goofy Name, Serious Wine.
Fred Vinifies and barrel ages each section of his family’s vineyard separately prior to blending his Old & Mature Vine Zinfandel. When he finds that a specific barrel does not fit the final blend he holds it apart and uses it in the Non-Vintage version. The result is a blend across two year’s production that is a tremendous value.
The name of this wine goes back to Fred’s high school years when his uncle would make light of Fred’s efforts to make wine. Although Fred’s, now grown and his wine is nothing to make light of, he has kept the name and his sense of humor. Tech Sheet for Scherrer Zinfandoodle v.8.9

Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs, Champagne Pierre Moncuit, Mesnil

Champagne Pierre Moncuit:Grand Cru Chardonnay from Le Mesnil in Champagne

Moncuit is a “Grower-Producer” Champagne house, which means the wines they make comes from grapes that they grow. This sounds logical, but it is rare in the world of Champagne. Think of large scale chain restaurants vs your favorite neighborhood, chef driven spot. The local place is run by the owners and the decisions they make day in and day out directly affect quality. The same is true for Champagne. Moncuit, which produces Grand Cru wines, is the neighborhood spot that also earns massive critical praise, but produces a miniscule amount of wine as compared to the big guys.

This Non Vintage Champange comes from a single, Grand Cru, vineyard called Mesnil in the Côte de Blancs where only Chardonnay is allowed. Only the very best sites are called Grand Cru, and yet the price of Moncuit is comparable to the mass produced wines, while it’s quality is exceptional.

– Moncuit’s 12,500 bottle production is tiny by most standards in Champagne.
– The property includes 15 hectaires in the Côte de Blancs surrounding the town of Mesnil.
– The crisp acidity and mineral profile of Moncuit’s wines provide a backbone for a deceivingly rich fruit that expands with bottle age. This is the style of the house.
– The NY Times and Wall Street Journal regularly select Moncuit’s NV as one of the best value Grand Cru Champagnes for sale in the US.
Read more about Pierre Moncuit

Cuvée Moncuit Delos

Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs: Pierre Moncuit is a proprietaire – recolant in the Grand Cru Village of Mesnil in the Côtes de Blancs. The house style is bright and racy with deceptively broad fruit through the middle. Winemaker Nicole Moncuit stresses elegance, balance and tension in her stunning Chardonnay based Champagnes. We welcome the chance to pour these wines beside their shockingly more expensive neighbors as they always stand out, no matter the crowd.
Read more about Cuvée Moncuit Delos

Here is a short video from Kris Van de Sompel, the Belgian sommelier elected “Ambassadeur de Champagne” in 2007, celebrating Moncuit and talking about the NV wine.

“Hermine d’Or”, Muscadet-Domaine de la Louvetrie, Loire Valley

Jo Landron

Jo Landron: Fine Muscadet ages for decades. Fine Muscadet speaks of the soil and the site where it grew as well as any grape. Fine Muscadet represents one of the best values in the world of wine. Fine Muscadet pairs with the same foods that sing with Premier and Grand Cru Chablis, at a fraction of the price.

The man with mustache grows and makes some fine Muscadets.

He does it by selecting specific parcels for his different bottlings, by farming biodynamically, by using only native yeasts to ferment his grapes, and by allowing most of his wines to rest on their lees for an extended period. We celebrate his effort by drinking his wines in all sorts of weather and with all sorts of foods, and by stashing cases of them in our cellars to be consumed years from now, or in the case of the magnums we import, decades from now.
Read more about Domaine de la Louvetrie

Hermine d’Or

“Hermine d’Or”: Aged on its lees for twelve months and stirred to promote the development of carbon dioxide in the wine, the Hermine d’Or is a first taste of what happens when Muscadet is made to age. The lees contact gives the wine a significantly broader mouth feel than the Domaines or the Amphibolite and opens the door to pairings with richer fish served in sauce. From 12-40 year old vines.
Read more about Hermine d’Or

Sauvignon Blanc “The Supernatural”, &co, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand

&co: Gabrielle Simmers spent a decade searching for the perfect site to produce a unique, elegant, old world style New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. Gabrielle is a firm believer in traditional methods of farming to promote the natural health of the vines, and a winemaking process which relies on the quality of the terroir alone.
Read more about &co

The Supernatural

“The Supernatural”: The Supernatural 2009 (the name refers to And Co’s viticultural practices) is the first release from And Co Ltd. A rich, opulent, aromatic white, The Supernatural is made with grapes sourced exclusively from low-yielding, organically grown estate vineyards planted in 2003 and 2004. Gabrielle believes in minimum intervention: her wine is naturally vinified and she only adds sulphur at bottling for freshness and to bring the wine to the shelves.
The Supernatural reflects the sun-drenched south sea days Hawke’s Bay is famous for. Atypical nuances of honeysuckle, spice and smoke, a distinct minerality, a strong citrus seam and a rich texture define the personality of The Supernatural. Forget what you know about this variety, The Supernatural is a uniquely complex creature.
Read more about The supernatural

Prosecco Extra Dry, Tenuta Santomè, Italy

Tenuta Santomè: The Spinazze family has a long history in the Veneto, dating back to the early 1900’s. Today, brothers William and Alan oversee the vines and the winery, always careful to listen to the advice of their father more who is a local legend in the vines and business of Prosecco.
Read more about Tenuta Santomè

Santome Prosecco Extra Dry DOC

Prosecco Extra Extra Dry: Laws for Prosecco ensure that the Prosecco grapes are grown in a small region and there is a quiet revolution going on. Santomè goes a step further, using native yeasts and using only Prosecco (aka Glera) grapes in their Brut and Extra Dry Proseccos. This extra step leads to a purity rarely found in Prosecco, much less at this price.
“Made to order” from estate grown Prosecco grapes in Treviso, Italy, Santomè keeps batches of still wine kept chilled and then fermented when needed for export, ensuring the freshest Prosecco on the market.
The Spinazze family is in their fourth generation of growing grapes, but they aren’t afraid to blend that experience with modernity. They have installed 888 solar panels on the roof of the winery that reduce electricity use and cutting costs. Being the first in the area to do so, they hope to make this a new tradition.
A remarkable option for glass pour and in cocktails.
Read more about Santomè Prosecco NV Extra Dry DOC

Cabernet Sauvignon “Nicolo”, Cosimo Maria Masini, Tuscany

Cosimo Maria Masini: Cosimo Maria Masini and his family grow grapes on their small Tuscan estate, alongside wheat, vegetables, ducks, chickens, and olives. Theirs’ is an integrated farm to be sure: chickens lay eggs that are combined with wheat to make pasta which can then be dressed in their own tomatoes and drizzled with olive oil from the rare Mignola Cerretana variety, all of which pair wonderfully with their white and red wines. Idyllic as this sounds, it’s a lifestyle that the Masini family chose to build for themselves for reasons of taste, conscience, and health. The wines are named for family members and members of the team: Nicole, Nicolo, Annick, Fedardo are both individuals and delicious bottles of wine.
Read more about Cosimo Maria Masini

Nicolò 2007

Nicolò: Nicolò is a blend of 100% biodynamic Cabernet Sauvignon (85%) and Cabernet Franc (15%). It provides an intriguing blend of aromas to anyone familiar with both Bordeaux and Tuscany. Our first thought when smelling it for the first time was “this is what so many ‘Super Tuscans’ fail to achieve…depth, balance, and power in an elegant package”.
Read more about Nicolò

“Carmina Major”, Domaine Turner Pageot, Languedoc

Domaine Turner Pageot: Husband and wife team Karen Turner and Emmanuel Pageot produce wines of both power and elegance in Gabian, one town south of Faugeres. Their farming is biodynamic and their skills have been honed in cellars from Alsace to Australia as well as in restaurants in London and Paris.
To preserve and promote balance and acidity, the family buys only north facing parcels ensuring elegant, mature fruit at harvest. Master of Wine Rosemary George touts them as a can’t miss new arrival in the area.
Read more about Domaine Turner-Pageot

Carmina Major 2009

“Carmina Major”: This wine smells, tastes, and costs the same as those wines that used to excite Hermitage and Cote-Rotie lovers of limited financial means. The top notes scream black pepper and red fruits just like the best northern version, but 30% Mourvedre brings an earthy undertone that suggest Bandol. This is an absolute bargain for the layers this wine possesses.
Read more about Carmina Major

Chianti Classico Riserva, Riecine, Tuscany

Chianti Classico Riserva

Chianti Classico Riserva: Riecine’s goal is as simple as it is lofty: To produce the finest Sangiovese-based wines in the world. Winemaker Sean O’Callaghan oversees production from vine to bottle and one of his first steps to better wine was the elimination of all synthetic pesticides and herbicides. In the winery, traditional oak casks are the norm and no new oak is used in the Chiantis.
Read more about Chianti Classico Riserva